Endre Hevezi

Painter turned architect, I started my artistic career in the nineteen fifties in Denmark. Here I painted portraits and mainly Hungarian landscapes in impressionistic style. Exhibited them in Copenhagen, Stockholm, Odense and other Scandinavian cities. Large scale commissions included the wall paintings of the Civic Centre of Ikast and the altarpiece of the church of Adelslyst.

Having moved to England, for a time I had to return to architecture but soon collected enough material to arrange an exhibition. This was held in the Drian Gallery, where subsequently I had a number of shows. The first couple of these were of three dimensional constructions, made in bronze, plastic, and ceramics, but later I returned to two-dimensional representations, painted in oil, pastels or witrified enamels. The oil paintings were mainly landscapes in post-impressionistic style. Pastel and Enamels mainly abstract.

Having an architectural background I received number of commissions for the decoration of public buildings, commercial premises and churches. These were mainly done in ceramics and mosaics. The most important of them are the stained glass windows, mosaic panels and decorative doors of the Cathedral of Debre Libanos in Ethiopia. Part of this material was exhibited, before transport, in the Festival Hall.
Unfortunately, after the late nineties, because of the illness of my wife, I had to fade out of artistic life. Now I try to start again. In the last couple of years I painted a fair collection of pictures. Together with the old ones there is more than enough material for choice. The oils, mainly romantic landscapes, at times with ruins, tend to abstraction. They are mainly of bluish-greenish grey with patches of red to invigorate the composition. The abstract pastels are more colourful, of warmer colour, here, again, the red plays an important role. I recently exhibited part of this material in the Hungarian Cultural Centre in London.

I have works in private collections of countries from Japan to Canada, in the National Gallery of Warsaw, Gdansk, and Budapest, The Museum of Decorative Art of Budapest, in the Szeged, and Silkeborg museum and the Usher Gallery in Lincoln.